2021-04-17 01:35:02

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543 I look upon this day, the king replied, as the fairest of my life; for it will become the epoch of uniting two houses which have been enemies too long, and whose mutual interests require that they should strengthen, not weaken, one another."How kind of Miss Eleanor to think of that!" responded the blind woman, delightedly. "It shows that she's just her own old self, always trying to think what everybody would like, and then doing her best to give it to them. Of course, there's a hundred questions that I should like to ask about her; and if you really don't mind answering them, and will do me the honor to step into my little cabin, some day when you're passing by, I shall be more obliged to you than I can rightly tell. But as to my ever seeing Miss Eleanor again,I beg your pardon, sir; you see I've not yet learned to say Mrs. Arling,though there's nothing on earth that would make me so glad as to meet her again, and hear the sound of her sweet, cheery voice, yet I'm getting to be too old to dare to reckon much upon the future. But the next best thing to meeting her, is to meet her son, here on the old place; and I thank the Lord that He has let me live long enough for that." 527 P.S.You may, in this occurrence, say what Francis I., after the battle of Pavia, wrote to his mother: All is lost except honor. As I do not yet completely understand the affair, I forbear to judge of it, for it is altogether extraordinary.

"Yes, massa, she done berry fine, I'se sure,spec' I put a right smart hour on her. Look a dar, now, don' she shine?""No!" roared the Major, with a dim suspicion that he was being made to appear ridiculous,"not unless you like to come out and take the horsewhipping yourself. On the whole, I'd just as soon give it to you."SACKING THE PALACE.

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"Thank you; not half so much as I deserve to be," replied he, only the more remorseful on account of the delicate consideration that she showed for him, while her cheek was still blanched, and her lips trembling, at her own narrow escape from danger caused by his rashness. And, feeling wholly unworthy to say another word to anything so pure and sweet, so utterly incompatible with the vile place and scene which he had just quitted, he stood aside, with uncovered head, to let her pass.

"Never!" growled Major Bergan, with an oath. "You would find it easier to lift the Gibraltar rock on the point of a needle. Unless," he added, after a moment, "you can tell me how to make a suit lie against Godfrey Bergan. I've been trying it for ten years, and I've spent money enough to buy another plantation as large as this."

"Forty and two years," said he, musingly, "since Eleanor went! Yet I can see her now, with her bright face and her arch ways! She was the sunshine of the old Hall; it has never been the same place since she left it. And she would hardly know it, if she were to come back now! But times change; and we are fools if we do not change with them. Well, my boy! I'm glad to see you, and that is not what I would say to many,I'm not much in the way of having visitors. But Eleanor's son is heartily welcome to the old place."

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"No!" roared the Major, with a dim suspicion that he was being made to appear ridiculous,"not unless you like to come out and take the horsewhipping yourself. On the whole, I'd just as soon give it to you."Dusk was fast gathering in the corners and under the arches of the little church, when the service was over. Parting with his relatives at the door, Bergan went his solitary way to his lodgings, through the deepening twilight. He walked slowly, not that the road was so pleasant, but because the end had so little attraction. The walls and furniture of his room were still strangers to him;no one corner would allure him with a more familiar charm than another, no particular chair would draw him irresistibly to its accustomed arms, no sweet, tangled crop of associations would fling their mingled light and shadow across the floor. It would all be dim, blank, lonely. And the foot falls but heavily on the path, the termination of which neither habit nor excites imagination!

"Are you bad, Mr. Arling? Tell me, are you really a bad man?"At the battle of Sohr, Biche was taken captive with the kings baggage. The animal manifested so much joy upon being restored to its master that the kings eyes were flooded with tears.

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Apr-17 01:35:02